The films in the previous chapter—and, indeed, many of the films reviewed in Sexcatraz—show how our sexual repression is continually mirrored back to us through the difficulties we encounter in the sexual aspect of our lives. They also show how the repressed becomes ever more insistent when its message is ignored. While steadily escalating conflict is a fundamental screenwriting principle, the biopics of Brandon Teena and Bob Crane show that the same effect can apply in real life. While Lolita’s Hubert Hubert failed to heed the return of the repressed, Brandon Sullivan reached a crossroads in Shame and Sarah Morton in Swimming Pool was ultimately able to open up to an emotionally and sexually freer life.

Having established the principle of the return of the repressed and seen—particularly in Swimming Pool’s Sarah Morton—how it can lead to genuine positive change, let’s take a closer look at this caterpillar-into-butterfly metamorphosis

Having established the principle of the return of the repressed and seen—particularly in Swimming Pool’s Sarah Morton—how it can lead to genuine positive change, let’s take a closer look at this caterpillar-into-butterfly metamorphosis—starting with Steven Soderbergh’s classic independent hit Sex, Lies, and Videotape.


Start: Sexcatraz Pt. 1 – Welcome to Sexcatraz
Previous: Sexcatraz Pt. 40 – Swimming Pool
Next: Sexcatraz Pt. 42 – Sex, Lies, and Videotape


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